Plenty of jobs are flexible enough to take with you while traveling – which means you can plonk yourself by the pool and earn some cash in your spare time! In this guest post from our friends at Save the Student, we find out how you can support yourself while on the road.

Unlike looking for part-time work locally, there are fewer language and time barriers to being a digital nomad: internet access, or ingenuity, is all you need to make money on the move! A laptop or tablet are useful, too – but most of the ideas below can be run right from your phone (or even face-to-face). Give them a go!

1. WRITING

Writing is the ultimate portable job, so if you’ve got the talent and the ideas, it’s worth a look.

Pitch yourself to magazines and newspapers at home and at your destination – if you’ve got published work, send them links! Mention any language skills you have, too: the more languages you’re fluent in, the more clients you can write for. Try:

  • Travel websites and travel guides
  • In-flight magazines
  • City guides and apps

Don’t just wait for the offers to roll in – keep an eye out for article ideas, places to visit, and people to interview. If you can’t sell your articles straight away, you could always create a blog or publish your own eBook on the go instead.

2. PHOTOGRAPHY

You’ll probably snap a ridiculous number of photos while you’re away – and that’s before all the selfies. Some of them could make you money!

There’s massive demand for ‘stock shots’ – images that companies, newspapers and advertisers might buy to use in their content and campaigns. The simplest way to sell your snaps is to upload them to a stock library: try EyeEm, Alamy or PicFair.

You could also upload to print-on-demand sites to sell your iconic images as bags, bibs, scarves and posters – take a look at Zazzle or Redbubble – or make and sell your own photo book. Posh!

3. VLOGGING

If you’ve ever fancied video blogging or making a movie, globe-trotting is your ticket to ride! Whether you take a smartphone or pack a proper camera, make the most of your kit and your experiences:

  • Upload reviews and recommendations, or live stream your night out
  • Capture everyday life or share language hints
  • Make a montage of your best shots and add a soundtrack over the top
  • Compile top tens: best bits, worst bits, quirky finds and travel hacks

Travelling is a great way to get interesting content and increase your followers on social media – once you get enough fans you could make money from sponsorship, brand placement and event invites. You can monetise your videos in the meantime by opting in to show adverts alongside on YouTube, for instance – or you could try to sell them directly to blogs and websites, or to stock libraries.

4. TASKWORK

Surveys can an easy way to build up small change or earn vouchers. Prolific is said to be one of the better payers but, as with many survey sites, how often you’re eligible for studies can vary.

Alternatively, there are several freelancer sites where you can pitch for projects across a vast array of skills and subjects, from tech support to voiceover work and everything in between: try Upwork or Fiverr.

5. BE A TOUR GUIDE

Once you’ve scouted out a location and soaked up its history, tour guiding is a way of putting your knowledge to use. It’s worth checking for any local regulations but, as an example, you don’t need qualifications or certificates to be a tour guide in the UK. So, do the research, advertise locally and on social media, and you could run your own walking tour. With permission, you could even lead tours inside galleries and museums (places where you’ll always find customers!).

Don’t forget to tailor tours to niche interests – art, celebrities, or tours in other languages, for instance. If food’s your passion you can host culinary experiences, either by cooking for tourists, or hosting a restaurant evening or wine tasting tour: take a look at Vizeat to see how it works.

6. TEACH A SKILL

Teaching comes with a bit more red tape, especially if you want to work with kids or teach an activity that needs insurance. Alternatively, there are tons of ways to teach on the internet with less hassle: think Skype lessons, video or blog subscriptions, eBooks and web chats. From language lessons to study skills and music tuition, if you’ve got a hobby, you can teach it!

It’s never been easier to find work on the go – but, wherever you end up, check local rules before you set up shop, and especially if there are any visa or residence restrictions on working at all (even as a freelancer). You may have to pay tax on the money you make: you’ll thank yourself for finding out, and preparing, well in advance. Good luck, and happy travelling!

Guest post by Ruth Bushi from Save the Student.

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